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Archive Monthly Archives: November 2017

VMware-VeloCloud merger raises enterprise stakes – TechTarget

VMware-VeloCloud merger raises enterprise stakes
TechTarget
While pointing out that he believes defining the split between the two is "useless," White goes on to paint the difference as a divide between organizations that make money directly off the network, such as providers, and ones that grudgingly pay for

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Jason Garrett's leadership will be tested without Ezekiel Elliott – Blogging The Boys (blog)


Blogging The Boys (blog)

Jason Garrett's leadership will be tested without Ezekiel Elliott
Blogging The Boys (blog)
Let's flash back to August of 2016. You're Jason Garrett, head coach of the Dallas Cowboys. The highest-valued professional sports franchise in the world looks set to embark on a successful season. Your marquee starting quarterback appears healthy
Atlanta Falcons vs Cowboys: Week 10 staff predictionsBlogging Dirty (blog)

all 695 news articles »

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The day America’s top soccer club threatened to move to Mexico

Before the start of MLS, the San Francisco Bay Blackhawks saw their best hopes in a foreign country

According to those who knew him, Dan Van Voorhis was a mass of contradictions generous, gregarious and fun-loving one moment then stubborn, irascible and aggressive the next. But Van Voorhis, a man whose patronage of American professional soccer was years ahead of its time, was nothing if not bold.

Bold enough, in fact, that by February 1993 he was prepared to do the unthinkable. His team, the San Francisco Bay Blackhawks, would apply for guest status in the Primera División, the highest level of professional soccer in Mexico.

Such was the sorry state of professional soccer in America in 1993 that the countrys own federation president wanted to help its premier franchise gain admittance into a foreign league.

Were having serious discussions with the Mexican Federation on the subject and I think there is a realistic possibility it could happen, said then president of US Soccer Alan Rothenberg in a press conference. I believe both the Blackhawks and the Mexican league are interested in testing what would be a new marketing concept.

The announcement came just one year before the US was to host the World Cup, a prerequisite of which was the development of a top-flight professional soccer league. But in 1993, a detailed conception of Major League Soccer was still some way off.

The Blackhawks were a part of the American Professional Soccer League (APSL). In 1990, two separate semi-professional competitions, the Western Soccer League and the American Soccer League, merged to form the only national professional league of the era. But after only two seasons, the APSL had shrunk to just five teams, three of which played in Florida. This meant that the Blackhawks traveled further than any other team in the league, a financial strain on Van Voorhis and a physical one on the players.

Still, it came as a surprise when less than two weeks after the Blackhawks had been eliminated from the 1992 playoffs Van Voorhis threatened to remove the team from the league entirely. His demand was simple: unless Rothenberg and US Soccer began delivering on plans to form a unified professional league, he was taking his money and his knowledge out of the game.

When his threats were met mostly with silence, Van Voorhis called a press conference in to announce that his team would not play in the APSL the following season. When asked why, Van Voorhis did not mince words.

Owners of the other APSL teams are not willing to make the financial commitment to bring professional soccer in this country to a Division I level, he declared. I have informed Alan Rothenberg that the Blackhawks are leaving the APSL, and have petitioned US Soccer to allow us to play an independent schedule until a full Division I league is in place.

There were not huge financial commitments [for joining the APSL], former APSL commissioner Bill Sage told The Guardian. It was whoever could field a credible team and get through the season and paid players at least something. It was a very eclectic group of owners, some of which had very deep pockets, and some didnt.

Some people were pretenders around the [ownership] table that could not participate at that level and then there was Dan and maybe a handful of guys that could.

The biggest sticking point for Van Voorhis was always the lack of a professional league comparable to todays MLS. Without one Van Voorhis knew that he was sinking his money into something that would never offer a return.

His catchphrase was like Wendys Wheres the beef? He said: Wheres the league? Wheres the league? I need a league to play in, said former Blackhawks head coach Laurie Calloway in an interview with The Guardian. MLS was promised and promised and promised and it wasnt happening and the World Cup was coming along and there was a deadline on getting a league together before the World Cup was awarded and Dan was right in the middle and Sepp Blatter and [the Mexican Federation officials] were the type of people he was talking to.

Van Voorhis was so dogged in his pursuit of a Division I league to play in that he routinely sent handwritten faxes to Blatter, Sage, and Rothenberg at all hours of the day. His staff even came up with a nickname for the messages, Dan-o-grams. While he waited for their responses, Van Voorhis began flirting with the Mexican Federation.

In the 1980s and early 1990s, soccer in America was dominated by promoters, opportunistic businessmen, often acting as middlemen, who recognized early on that there were millions of people, nearly all Latino, willing to pay money to watch professional soccer. Stadium contracts exclusive rights with stadium owners for all soccer-related events became the most profitable currency in American soccer. Van Voorhis seethed as local promoters brought in big crowds for Mexican club friendlies at Spartan Stadium in San Jose, California.

Were doing the work of the Lord and these promoter guys are making all the money, former Blackhawks general manager Terry Fisher recalls Van Voorhis telling him. Why arent we doing that?

Earlier in 1992, the Blackhawks had advanced to the semifinals of the Concacaf Champions Cup (today known as the Concacaf Champions League) where they had faced Mexican powerhouse Club América. In the second leg of the semi-final, the Blackhawks hosted América at Spartan Stadium. There, Van Voorhis watched in astonishment as more than 25,000 fans most of them Mexican poured through the turnstiles. The crowd dwarfed any that had ever come out to watch the Blackhawks.

In May 1993, Van Voorhis finally signed his own exclusive stadium contract, this one with the San Jose State University Foundation, which gave him full control over all soccer-related events at Spartan. But within a week of signing the contract, Van Voorhis found himself the target of litigation when he tried to stop a five-game Mexican club exhibition coordinated by Imperio Productions, a local promotion company. Van Voorhis tried pointing to the contract he had just signed, but his intransigence with the promoters cost him nearly $1m in arbitration.

Shortly before he died in 2005, Van Voorhis spoke with Fisher. I dont resent a dollar that I lost, Fisher remembers Van Voorhis telling him. But that $900,000 that I had to pay those fuckers broke my heart.

Despite the significant setback, Van Voorhis finally got his audience with the Mexican Federation in June. He and his front office staff traveled to Acapulco to present his plan to a gathering of Mexican club and Federation officials. He knew, or thought he knew, what would get their attention: money.

One of the biggest factors is the opportunity for [the Mexican clubs] to make money in California with how much money is here and how much Mexican support is here, the former Blackhawks business manager Eric Yamamoto, who helped Van Voorhis put together his presentation, told The Guardian.

Money, Van Voorhis had always believed, could solve any problem and overcome any obstacle. In that Van Voorhis was not entirely wrong, but he had severely underestimated the politics and culture surrounding international soccer governance.

He was totally naive to try and understand the politics of Mexican soccer, said Fisher. How is some lawyer from Berkeley, some 5ft 8in gringo going to live in the world of Mexican soccer?

Beyond all of the logistical issues with Van Voorhiss plan the travel, the transnational border crossings, the money his timing, as it was throughout his soccer career, was all wrong. In Acapulco, the Mexican Federation was trying to mediate a pay dispute with some national team players who had already threatened to go on strike. The Blackhawks plan was tabled with no definitive timetable for a decision. The dream was dead almost as soon as it had begun and suddenly the Blackhawks had nowhere to play.

Van Voorhis, however, was not yet ready to give up on his experiment. He entered the Blackhawks, now renamed the San Jose Hawks, into the United States Interregional Soccer League (USISL), a 43-team minor league operation. The Hawks picked up where the Blackhawks had left off, winning their division with ease and earning themselves a berth in the Sizzlin Six, a six-team tournament of divisional winners. But despite winning both of their tournament matches, the Hawks missed out on the final on goal differential.

Having already spent an estimated $10m on the Blackhawks and with scant hope of a Division I professional league kicking off in 1994, Van Voorhis began scaling back his operation and dismantling the foundation that he had built. While he went on to play a critical role in bringing Major League Soccer to the Bay Area, Van Voorhis lacked the wherewithal to own his own franchise in the nascent league. The team that eventually kicked off in 1996, the San Jose Clash, was owned and operated by the league.

Van Voorhis, the man who had kept professional soccer in the Bay Area alive in the late 80s and early 90s, could only sit and watch from his private box at Spartan Stadium as the dream he had spent so much of his own time and money trying to build manifested itself on the very field and with many of the same coaches and players he had once employed where he had watched his Blackhawks go toe-to-toe with some of the biggest clubs in North America.

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Are Dak Prescott, Carson Wentz & Jared Goff the best QB draft class since 1983? – Blogging The Boys (blog)


Blogging The Boys (blog)

Are Dak Prescott, Carson Wentz & Jared Goff the best QB draft class since 1983?
Blogging The Boys (blog)
The 1983 quarterback draft class is widely regarded as the best in modern NFL history. Three Hall of Famers were chosen in the first 27 picks and a fourth enjoyed a long, successful career. Some (me) are already proclaiming the 2016 quarterback class

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Cowboys @ Falcons injury updates: Tyron Smith questionable, Dez Bryant will play – Blogging The Boys (blog)


Blogging The Boys (blog)

Cowboys @ Falcons injury updates: Tyron Smith questionable, Dez Bryant will play
Blogging The Boys (blog)
The Dallas Cowboys might have to play the Atlanta Falcons without a couple of their offensive stars. Ezekiel Elliott will miss the contest while serving the first game of his six-game suspension, and left tackle Tyron Smith may also miss the game

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9 Rookie Business Lessons That Are Always Best Learned The Hard Way

Since I was a kid, I’ve always been obsessed with business. I never really knew what I wanted to do because I had so many different interests growing up. That sense of curiosity still sticks with me till this day, which makes it a lot more exciting when something sparks.

I was always 100 percent certain I would be in business somehow. I just knew. I didn’t care what type of business, as long as I thought it was fun and it could make a lot of money. That’s all I ever knew growing up. I just didn’t know where to start.

I had always done things like sold candy, washed cars or anything a kid could do to make money. At 18, that fire really ignited, and it became a deadly obsession.

Business is the most fascinating sport that was ever created. The playing field is global, it never stops and the number of players is limitless. It’s a battle royal for who can climb higher and higher, and the best part is no one knows the outcome on the other side. It requires complete sacrifice, perseverance and determination to stay in the game. An unprecedented level of focus and hustle are needed to compete.

The game isn’t over, but these are a few of the things I’ve learned along the way:

1. Business is simple.

All you have to do is start by creating value for someone. It’s about identifying a problem that a group of people haveand going out to develop a better solution that someone is willing to pay for. In the case of most tech startups, it’s about creating a product or service people genuinely love to use over and over, and get hooked on because it’s fun, entertaining or fills a void in their lives. Not easy, but simple.


2. People are everything.

Business is just groups of people working together toward building something awesome. I’ve hired and fired people. Even people who were once close to me. Unfortunately, not everyone is as great as they may seem initially, and this is probably the most important part of the whole game, and by far the most difficult to get right.

As long as you’re around good people, anything can happen. Anyone can find a Harvard or Yale MBA, but it’s hard to go deeper than what’s on a rsum and learn about the struggles and adversity someone has faced. Getting to truly know that person’s story and why they want to join your journey is more important.

It’s like dating. The hottest girl in the world might just provide short term gratification, and few months after the honeymoon phase, you realize you want someone who you actually connect with beyond just the physical attraction. In business, after you get over the fact that the person has a fancy piece paper, but is a complete f*cking d*ck, you’ll want them to get the f*ck out of your face. Hiring based on personality, attitude and character ispriority because that’s what can’t be taught.


3. It’s not about raising capital. It’s about your product.

I’ve dug myself into holes before obsessing over investors and the dollar signs in front of what we raised. If you don’t have to raise don’t do it because the headlines are making you feel like you should. It’s not needed for every business. After all, ownership is everything, right? It’s oxygen, and it certainly matters, keeping you in the game or taking your business to the next level.

I’ve dug myself into holes before obsessing over investors and the dollar signs in front of what we raised. If you don’t have to raise don’t do it because the headlines are making you feel like you should. It’s not needed for every business. After all, ownership is everything, right? It’s oxygen, and it certainly matters, keeping you in the game or taking your business to the next level.

It’s not everything, though. I’ve seen people raise tens of millions and have to fold because the product just wasn’t there. I’ve also seen people raise nothing and do incredibly well for themselves. Money is a tool to buy time. If you have time, you can probably figure it out, but it’s not always the case.


4. Timing is everything.

We live in a world of uncertainty, and no one knows what’s going to happen next. It makes the game that much more interesting. You could get everything right. The team, the product, the investors, the growth, but all of a sudden, everything changes and you go bust. This is the factor we must use our judgment to determine and can play the biggest role in your success.

Things just happen sometimes. The market doesn’t give a sh*t about who you are or where you come from or what connections you have. Ever heard of being in the right place at the right time? Yeah, well the same thing applies to business. Being on the market at the right time definitely helps.


5. Start small.

Create value for a small group. I know you want to take over the entire industry that you’re in and capitalize on all the people who need your product. Find a target market, and start with a relatively small size of people to focus on. Once you’ve created value for a small group, then you know you can scale that up. Talk to them a lot. They know more than you do about their problems. If you start off trying to take over the world, you’ll have no entry point and just be all over the place.

It takes time to figure it out. This is the very reason most of these hot social products start off at colleges. It allows you to test and iterate using a controlled group of people. The entire state of California is not a controlled group of people. Find a crew, build something cool for them, and you’ll know when you’re on to something.


6. Work hard.

Sh*t will happen if you stay in the game long enough. Good stuff takes time to build and grow. Our generation wants to strike rich quickand needs to realize that’s not the way the game works.

When has anything great come instantly? You have to put in the hours. All the overnight success stories you hear about are not what they appear to be. Most likely, those teams working on the products were grinding for years until something clicked. The harder you work, and longer you stay in the game, the higher the likelihood of you succeeding is. Just don’t give up, and keep moving forward.

If you want instant gratification, then you’re in the wrong place. This game isn’t the least bit instant. It’s a long-term play, and you have to be willing to give everything up for it. Even if you don’t see the outcome today or tomorrow, it’ll happen eventually. You have to really want it, and the lifestyle isn’t for everyone. But the only way to win is to play the game.


7. Forget about the bullsh*t.

Don’t listen to thehype. There’s more beneath the surface to every story. Every overnight success took 8-10 years to build. Keep f*cking working your ass off if you believe in your company. Every company acquisition, press release and fundraiser has a true story behind it.

For example, just because you got acquired doesn’t necessarily mean it was a successful exit. The company could’ve been acquired to save public face of the founders and investors. There are so many things that come into play that look sexy, but they just aren’t.

Don’t get totally caught up in the industry. Remember, the media will always feed you what will get you talking. Be aware and knowledgeable of what’s going on, but please, don’t take everything for face value. Be skeptical of everything you hear. You know more than you think you do.


8. This isn’t sexy.

You have to love the journey. There’s a ton of suffering, hard work and pain that the external world will never see in this game. The loneliness, depressionand struggle that entrepreneurs go through is mind blowing, and everyday people think this is solely being done for riches. Sure, we all want to make a ton of money, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that. It’s capitalism after all. There’s more to it, though.

Changing the world, making an impact on other people’s lives, and being extremely passionate are also of part of the game. We do this for other people more than we do it for ourselves. We do it because we firmly believe we can change the world. We see a future where something can be made better, and we’re crazy enough to chase that vision and belief.

If you’re solely getting into this for money, you’re not going to last. It’s too hardand too painful for just the money. Investment banking sounds more like your game if that’s all you want. There has to be an emotional connection that compels you to do this for the long term.


9. Just start.

Stop making excuses about school, partying or the new episode of “Game of Thrones.” All that stuff will always be there for you to fall back on, but this opportunity may not be. Find a problem that impacts you personally or the people around you, and go for it

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The reluctant Airbnb host: why I rent my spare bedroom to pay my own rent

As rents soar in Los Angeles and elsewhere, the room-sharing service can be helpful but it has also faced some of the blame for the housing crisis

Ive never found scrubbing other peoples fecal matter from my toilet seat particularly fun, nor does sharing my shower appeal, and yet this is my daily routine.

Im an Airbnb host. Its not that I enjoy losing my spare bedroom and my privacy to entertain out of town visitors: I use the platform to be able to pay rent while I go through a difficult financial time. Ten nights a month, I have to tolerate a stranger using my bathroom to get 20 nights blissfully alone with my son.

We live in an impoverished area of Los Angeles close to a large convention center and a university. It is not a tourist hub by any means, so demand for my area is not high. The types of people who book my spare room tend to be business trip visitors, convention-goers, students and saddest of all Los Angeles residents who have found themselves unable to afford rent and must wander from cheap short-term rental to short-term rental until theyve scratched together enough money to afford a security deposit.

In my year as a host, Ive gagged while picking up nail clippings left by rich Korean students, and Ive left bad reviews for tight-lipped teens who declared my toddler annoying. I have once told three girls from San Francisco who slammed doors from midnight until 4am to pack their bags and leave. But on the whole, these are petty inconveniences balanced out by my hunger for financial help.

Transient guests dont have too much baggage, which is a blessing: my tiny two-bedroom guesthouse is already crammed with books and kids toys. Ive had three guests out of maybe 50 who have ever engaged me in conversation beyond how do you turn the shower on, and while they were genuinely lovely people, they havent had any impact on my life.

Their money has, though. In a city where the median wage is $28,000 a year and the median rent for a one bedroom is now $2,000 a month, I may not have a home for me, my son and my pets without it.

If you think that most hosts fit my profile, you should think again. A sizeable chunk of Airbnbs revenue has not come from the people featured in the companys promotional videos: Inja and James, the sweet, charity-focused elderly couple, Vanessa, the African American widow from south LA, or the single mom on benefits struggling with an international divorce (me).

Instead, a big part of its revenue has historically been driven by commercial property owners and landlords with multiple properties who rent out everything from luxurious mansions to rent-fixed units intended for long-term residents.

Those sites are removed from the housing market to accommodate Airbnb clients, meaning that long-term, affordable housing options become more and more scarce.

The accusation that Airbnb has contributed to the affordable housing crisis is not new: its what has led New York to pursue a law which prohibits short-term rentals of fewer than 30 days at a time, unless the owner is present as a host. Airbnb spent $11m on a Super Pac to fight the regulations but dropped a lawsuit when the city agreed to only prosecute hosts who violate the law, and not Airbnb itself. (In 2016, the company agreed to collaborate with the city and to crack down on individuals renting out multiple homes.)

The same pattern unfolded in San Francisco, with Los Angeles the latest big city to try and step in to implement restrictions.

Scott Shatford was the first person to be convicted in the city of Santa Monica for snapping up leases on singles and one-bedrooms in extremely desirable locations.

Shatford told me he would negotiate with the landlord and pay 10%-20% of the asking price to include a subletting clause in his lease (subletting is banned in every standard California leasing contract). Other times, he wouldnt even bother bringing up the issue. He spent $5,000-$10,000 on furnishing each apartment, and then placed them on the Airbnb site. After about three months, he began to make money.

At the height of his rental empire, Shatford managed seven properties on Airbnb none of which he owned, all of which had been intended for long-term residents. After he failed to respond to cease-and-desist letters from the city (he claims he did not receive them), he was finally convicted when the city itself rented four nights in one of his properties and took him to court.

Shatford no longer rents out properties and has moved to Denver with his wife, Julia. He now runs a data analytics company, AirDNA, which scrapes data from Airbnb in order to provide investment information to those who wish to purchase or lease properties specifically for the short-term housing market.

Insideairbnb.com, a site run by Murray Cox and Tom Slee, also scrapes data from Airbnb. Their site rose to prominence after they discovered that Airbnb had wiped more than a thousand listings from their site just days before releasing data which they claimed supported their defense that their site was used primarily for home sharing, predominantly by ethnically diverse lower middle class and working class professionals (the Airbnb New York public policy lead, Josh Meltzer, later acknowledged the site had removed approximately 1,500 listings from our platform in New York City that were controlled by commercial operators and did not reflect Airbnbs vision for our community. )

Cox and Slee have used their data to argue that Airbnb has had a significant impact on the housing crisis, has exacerbated gentrification, and yet has used home sharers as a visible front for their organizing and for their mission to expand.

When I reached out to the Airbnb spokesperson Connie Llanos, a former press officer for the Los Angeles mayor, Eric Garcetti, for comment about the companys role in the availability of long-term housing, Llanos said she didnt see Airbnb as a significant contributor to this problem, stating: We have no tolerance for individuals who abuse our platform we will take action against them.

As for Scott Shatford, he doesnt see regulation concerning multiple units as enforceable, by either Airbnb or the various governments and cities trying to regulate abuses. He points to the fact that despite his conviction and his fine of $3,500, the city actually lost money by having to book one of his listings themselves in order to catch him.

Whether hes right remains to be seen property owners illegally listing multiple properties have started to face legal consequences. In June 2016, the city attorney filed a suit which listed a number of Venice Beach properties, most of them rent-fixed, allegedly being used as illegal Airbnb short term rentals after evicting long term tenants.

As for me? I continue to rent my spare bedroom. I have never had a guest pay more than $45 a night, and Airbnbs smart pricing system regularly suggests I set my price at $26 a night, meaning a weeks rent would cost a guest $182 well below half my rent, and not even beginning to touch upon utilities.

This is, of course, purely optional. No one forces you to set your prices, but that ever-present suggestion niggles me. Its an indicator that in a city where the housing crisis is evident on every corner, I, the home-sharer, am the one picking up the price for the low-budget tourist.

What is clear is that something needs to happen. Airbnb is not solely responsible for the short term-housing crisis, but it is a factor. Rents are continuing to rise. Demand for cheap, tourism-driven getaways is insatiable. At the back of my mind is the question: if Airbnb didnt exist, would my rent even be this high?

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Police see rise in income from speed awareness courses – BBC News

Image copyright PA
Image caption Police forces use income from speed awareness course to fund enforcement

Speed awareness courses provided more than 23m to 20 police force areas in England in one year, the BBC has learned.

Official figures show the number of drivers taking the courses increased 26.5% in that time.

Amounts charged vary as the courses are run by private companies.

Senior police officers claimed forces make no money from the courses and the fees only cover the cost of enforcement.

Most forces keep about 35 of the fee – between 79.50 and 92.50 in total – depending on area and course provider, or it goes to road safety partnerships they run with councils.

The money is to cover the costs of catching speeding motorists and processing offences.

Drivers can choose to take a course instead of receiving points on their licences, which can contribute to an eventual ban for repeated offences.

There was a 26.5% rise in drivers taking the course between 2013 and 2014.

In 2014, the last full year for which data is available, the 20 forces that responded in full to requests for information, out of 39 in England, retained 23.1m compared with 19.7m the year before – a rise of 17%.

For 2015, the figure was 18.3m up to the end of November, the time of asking, but does not take into account any income processed since then.

Over the 20 forces, 995,541 drivers were caught speeding in 2013, rising to 1.1 million the following year. By November 2015, more than 1 million drivers had already been caught.

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Greater Manchester Police retained about 1.45m up to November 2015, compared with 1.39m for the whole of 2014.

Ch Insp Rachel Buckle, from the Roads Policing Unit, said: “This money has always been, and continues to be, used to fund our Central Ticket Office, the back office processing function. This has not changed as a consequence of austerity measures.”

The largest force in England, the Metropolitan Police, did not hold all the information requested, while West Midlands Police, the second largest, has not responded to a request under the Freedom of Information Act.

In Bedfordshire, where police and crime commissioner Olly Martins believes turning on M1 speed cameras permanently will generate millions of pounds for the force, the number of people sent on awareness courses almost doubled in one year.

There were 20,562 courses completed in 2014 compared with 11,132 the year before. The force would not reveal its figures for 2015 at the time of asking.

Rise in offenders re-trained

Speed awareness courses, as well as other training alternatives to fines for offences such as not wearing a seat belt, are overseen by the not-for-profit National Driver Retraining Scheme (NDORS). Figures show the total number of drivers taking courses across the UK has risen from 467,601 in 2010 to 1,355,796 in 2014, the last year for which data is available.

It says the increase in some cases is “due to the fact that not all courses were available in all police forces”.

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Motoring research charity the RAC Foundation said there was not a clear picture as to whether the courses cut re-offending.

Director Steve Gooding said: “Intuitively, education seems a better option than penalising drivers for what, in many cases, are minor transgressions.

“But we don’t have a clear picture of whether the courses change behaviour.”

National Police Chiefs’ Council lead for roads policing, Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, said: “Driver retraining courses have been well received by motorists and contribute to reducing deaths and casualties on our roads.

“Police forces do not make money from the courses. The scheme’s financial model is designed to provide police forces with cost recovery only.”

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How This Blogger Learned To See The Value In Designer Clothes – Refinery29


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How This Blogger Learned To See The Value In Designer Clothes
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After spending a summer working in New York City and completing a degree in fashion communication, she moved to Berlin in 2012, launching her blog, Not Your Standard, the same year. “I was able to get my Italian citizenship through my family and live

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